Nigeria, others tasked over ‘environmental hazard’ of e-waste

Nigeria, others tasked over ‘environmental hazard’ of e-waste

Nigeria, others tasked over ‘environmental hazard’ of e-waste

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Nigeria and other countries have been asked to address proper management of e-waste in the wake of illegal exports of hazardous materials into the country.
[su_quote]“Electronic waste that is still put into the trash is a big problem, and governments along with private companies need to act promptly in order to prevent uncontrolled e-waste that pollutes the planet. From televisions and smartphones to keyboards and computers monitors, electronic waste is constantly discarded when it could be properly and professionally processed. Doing so will save resources and reduce general electronic waste globally. “[/su_quote]
Technological upgrades in smartphones, tablets, computers, and entertainment equipment prompts people to discard their old devices to make room for new ones”, according to eReflect, a designer of typing software Ultimate Typing, which launched a campaign on the hazards posed to the environment by e-waste.
According to the company, “rather than being handled in an environmentally responsible way, this e-waste often ends up being illegally exported to African countries like Ghana and Nigeria, as well as to India and China.”
eReflect is calling on countries like Nigeria and others to urge their citizens to take the problem of e-waste more seriously.
The company also shared an educational infographic on e-waste by SIMS Metal Management which reveals that two tons of electronic waste end up in American landfills annually.
eReflect wants citizens to take e-waste more seriously, “because it is a dangerous environmental issue that will soon pose many health and natural hazards if no initiative is taken to handle it properly.”
The amount of e-waste is exponentially growing as people discard all sorts of technological equipment and devices in landfills, according to eReflect which underscores that “as the number of electronic devices grow, this disposal is happening much more frequently and in larger volumes.”
“E-waste involves precious metals too, such as gold, palladium, and copper, and although these are in small quantities they should not be simply discarded.”
While recycling initiatives have significantly helped in reducing global e-waste, eReflect reckons there is “still much more to be achieved.”
According to the company, “in 2000, 10% of electronic waste was recycled, but 11 years later 24.9% of electronic waste was being properly recycled and processed. This has been a significant improvement, but there’s still a lot of room for more rigorous e-waste management practices.”
According to eReflect, “Electronic waste that is still put into the trash is a big problem, and governments along with private companies need to act promptly in order to prevent uncontrolled e-waste that pollutes the planet. From televisions and smartphones to keyboards and computers monitors, electronic waste is constantly discarded when it could be properly and professionally processed. Doing so will save resources and reduce general electronic waste globally. “
It wants technology users to educate themselves on recycling and other e-waste management practices in their community, and see how they can eliminate electronic waste.
“Awareness needs to be raised about the hazards of electronic waste, and countries need to adopt more green and sustainable practices on e-waste management,” eReflect adds.
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